The Wing Chun foundation for Jeet Kune Do

I just the found the video below on you tube and I just could not resist to write this post.  Having read many books and articles about Jeet Kune Do (JKD) as well as having practiced wing chun solidly for over 5 years I was kind of giving for granted what I see in the video but it’s obvious that for some people it is not.

JKD is a concept and not a style; basic principle behind JKD is to learn various martial arts and just retain what works for the individual, discarding what doesn’t work.  This is somehow a precursor concept of MMA fighting, mixing styles to have a complete repertoire of techniques that cover all ranges of fighting including grappling and ground work.  In my opinion that is somehow fine for a person which has decent experience in one style, then moves on to the next one and so on.  Trying to learn at the same time different styles just creates confusion because a correct stance for one could be wrong for the other and you never know which one is which.

In principle different practitioners of JKD could have developed, given the hundred of martial styles available, completely different kind of JKD.  However if you join a JKD school, as long as it is authorised from one of the original students of Bruce Lee (Dan Inosanto, also portrayed in the video, comes to mind), you will learn from scratch techniques that seem to be unique of JKD but, apart from some simple adaptations of footwork and other details they replicate very precisely basic Wing Chun techniques and concepts.  Enjoy the video:

Jeet Kune Do trapping by Inosanto

Dan Inosanto is a martial arts expert amongst the best known in the west world due to his early work with Bruce Lee and then being one of the few certified teachers of Jeet Kune Do the way of the intercepting fist defined by Bruce Lee as a non-style of fighting that encourages students to learn different styles, peek and choose the essential bits of each and discard the superfluous.  Dan Inosanto is a true master of many different martial arts and I always like in his interviews and videos the continuous reference to one or the other art, pointing out differences and similarities. In many ways this approach marries my philosophy about martial arts.

In this video he shows a few basic principles about Jeet Kune Do trapping.  Trapping is mostly used by a few Chinese, Indonesian and Filipino arts and essentially it manifests by grabbing, slapping or deflecting an attacking limb with the intent of neutralise the attack or prevent a block or counter attack.

Panantukan by Dan Inosanto

Dan Inosanto is a martial arts expert amongst the best known in the west world due to his early work with Bruce Lee and then being one of the few certified teachers of Jeet Kune Do.  He is a true master of many different martial arts and I always like in his interviews and videos the continuous reference to one or the other art, pointing out differences and similarities. In many ways this approach marries my philosophy about martial arts.

In this video he shows a few basic principles about Panatukan, a Filipino style of boxing that uses a much broader set of techniques and moves compared to the western boxing.

Silat by Inosanto

Dan Inosanto is a very famous martial artist and master: he joined one of Bruce Lee’s school back in 1964 and developed his skills in becoming a master in at least 6 differents arts.

Silat is family of martial arts originated in South East Asia, particularly Malaysia and Indonesia: what I find fascinating about Silat is the very flowing movements develop into strikes, joint locks and throws, switching in very fast motions between one position and the other.

This short clip I found on YouTube shows Dan Inosanto explaining a couple of combinations of attack and defence that develop from a kick and a punch from the attacker into his total annihilation.  The guy on the right hand side of the screen is Ron Balicky, director of the Inosanto Academy and expert himself of Jeet Kune Do, Silat and several other styles.

Enjoy the view and please leave a comment: